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Cybersecurity in the IoT era – the multi-layered imperative

 

With IoT increasing the number of network connected devices by orders of magnitude, the opportunities for hackers to breach systems are also multiplying. To protect people, assets and data in this challenging environment, a comprehensive, multi-layered approach to cybersecurity is needed.

 

In the past, most security systems worked in a stand-alone way, meaning that they were not connected to other systems, or to the public internet. Now, things have changed, and IoT in particular makes it possible to automate alerts and share them with other systems and users across the organization. Systems are also frequently connected with cloud-based systems, with video data passing over the WAN and public internet to be stored off-site.

 

The rapid growth in the size and complexity of networks and IoT connected devices presents new opportunities – namely interaction between people and devices on a global scale. But at the same time, it also amplifies the risks of security breaches and other malicious attacks. And as we see all too often in the press, these kinds of breaches usually result financial losses, reduced customer confidence, and other negative outcomes.

 

Cybersecurity threats now span networks, applications, and device 

The complexity of video security networks and applications, and the growing number of IoT devices being connected to networks, create multi-layered cybersecurity risks – all of which need to be addressed concurrently. 

 

To cover all the bases, organizations must not only consider potential vulnerabilities in IoT sensors and devices. They should also consider the security of networks themselves, along with end-to-end data protection, application security and a host of other factors.

 

At the transport layer, or network layer, for example, criminals have the opportunity to exploit switches and ports to steal or tamper with data. At the application layer – as outlined in the OWASP top ten for application security  – hackers are looking to take advantage of system and configuration vulnerabilities to access data and ‘take over’ operation of connected