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Supporting sea turtle conservation with Hikvision technology

 

"Injured sea turtles recovering at the Lampedusa Turtle Rescue have to be monitored 24 hours a day. To support this important work, Hikvision has contributed a video system that helps the staff and volunteers to track their recovery," says Maurizio Coates from Hikvision Italy. 

 

The worrying trend of sea-turtle decline

For hundreds of years, sea turtles have been captured and killed for their eggs, meat, skin, and shells – causing numbers to fall to critical levels. Today, they are also at risk from industrialized fishing techniques, which result in accidental capture of turtles – often known as bycatch – and from climate change and urbanization, which are negatively impacting traditional nesting sites and hindering turtle reproduction. 

 

As a result of all of these human-caused risks, sea turtle populations have declined rapidly. Today, six out of the seven sea turtle species are endangered according to the WWF, with three species on the 'critically endangered' list. 

 

"Human activities result in extreme risks for sea turtles. Fishing, pollution and ship traffic are the most common threats."

 

Daniela Freggi, Biologist and Founder of the Rescue Center for Sea Turtles at Lampedusa, Italy.

 

Global and local conservation means there's still hope

Thanks to conservation efforts by NGOs around the world, there is still hope that sea turtle populations can recover and thrive long term. 

 

One example of an organization that is working to protect the species is the Lampedusa Turtle Rescue in Italy. The center was set up 20 years ago by Biologist Daniela Freggi and is managed by the Caretta Caretta Association. 

 

The rescue center aids and treats around 100 injured turtles a year, most caught accidently by fishing boats – either with longline hooks or trawling nets. To support the turtles' recovery, the center is equipped with an intensive care unit, an operating room, radiography and ultrasound equipment, and an outpatient 'clinic'. 

 

The center attracted volunteers from Italy and overseas, who study and monitor sea turtles, care for injured turtles, and educate tourists and community members about how to look after and protect them.